Both these establishments serve solid sandwiches. At the Local Press they run about a buck more, lean hotter and meltier, and encourage a slower pace. The Crooked Mile takes the wrap out of the sad Lypstian realm (and they come with chips, not gherkins). Each café offers a satisfying way to fuel another afternoon of the meaningless typing and desperate self-promotion that passes for work in the information economy. Burroughs’ Naked Lunch warned of “that frozen moment in time when everyone sees what is on the end of their fork.” If we want to avoid such an instant, perhaps we should skip the fork entirely and opt for sandwiches instead.

Crooked Mile Café | 428 Brighton Ave, Portland | 207.772.8708 | Monday — Friday, 6:30am-5pm; Saturday, 7am-3pm | Sandwiches about $7 | Visa/MC
The Local Press | 276 Woodford St, Portland | 207.773.0039 | Tuesday — Saturday, 11 am-6pm | Sandwiches about $8 | Visa/MC

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