Fateful changes

By BRIAN DUFF  |  October 17, 2007

The flavors in the tender meatballs, the sautéed mushrooms, and the oily, meaty ribs that were our favorite were more Italian than Spanish — with lots of garlic, oregano, and tomato. Livers with shallot were a bit too straightforward and fried leeks might have balanced the flavor better. Manchego, a bit less dry, salty, and intense than the Micucci version that has become a personal staple, came with sweet slices of bright dulce de membrillo in the style that Argentine hipsters use to end their meals.

American labor unions have begun to focus their attention west of the old industrial belt. When I joined UAW Local 2165, I was in California. So should we, entering Local 188, lean west toward the bar. You are closer to the knives, the heat, and the liquor (though maybe not to sex with the staff). It reminds you of the old community feel across the street, where a misplaced dish was no big deal.

Brian Duff can be reached at bduff@une.edu.

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