Maria's Taqueria

Fast, fresh Mexican in a neighborhood that needs it
By MC SLIM JB  |  July 8, 2009


Apple's ubiquitous iPhone ads would have you believe there's a portable application for every possible problem. How about this one: finding good, inexpensive chow in culinary dead zones at odd hours of the day? (And no, that Yelp app doesn't do it, either.) One such difficult neighborhood is the Theatre District late at night, which on weekends attracts throngs of young habitués of its cluster of nightclubs. The options for a quick late-night bite are pretty grim, but got better not too long ago with the addition of Maria's Taqueria, a 16-seat storefront that slings Mexican food, mostly tacos and burritos, until 1 am. 

Maria's Taqueria | 226 Tremont Street, Boston | Open seven days a week | 10–1 am | 617.357.7399.

The true test of any taqueria is its protein fillings: here, the options are shrimp, carnitas, chicken, steak, and beans/rice. Portions are very good: each shrimp taco ($2.75/one; $7/three) features four medium-size shrimp, enough for some in each bite, properly built on two soft-corn tortillas. The other taco fillings are similarly strong (and all priced at $2.25 and $6.25). Carnitas is the standout: deeply flavored, long-braised pork shoulder falling to tender shreds. Steak is chewy and salty, very nice. Chunks of chicken breast are the most generously laid-on, and boast the strongest admixture of herbs, mostly oregano. The toppings of pico de gallo, mild jack cheese, sour cream, and a jolt of green-chili hot sauce strike me as perfectly balanced, not too messy, making the optional add-on of passable guacamole (75 cents) superfluous.

These same fillings can be padded out in a burrito with rice and black beans in a flour tortilla in two sizes: grande ($5.50–$7/12 inch) or tradicional ($4–$5.50/10 inch). Quesadillas ($4.50–$6.75) press them flat in a flour tortilla with a lot of cheese, grilled to a gooey melt. Salads ($5–$6.75) underpin them with iceberg lettuce, avocado, black beans, and pico de gallo. Dinner plates ($5.50–$6.50) are the naked option: filling, rice, beans, pico. After the tacos, I think the best platform is the torta (chicken, steak, or carnitas, $6.25): a sandwich with lettuce, tomato, cheese, and guacamole, built on a good house-baked roll shaped like an oversize burger bun. Drink options include American and Mexican sodas ($1.50). The space is clean and brightly lit, the service quick, the frills minimal. Never mind the hormonally charged, euphoric club kids who pack the place late on weekend nights; for the Emerson students and nearby workers who provide its lunch and dinner trade, Maria's offers fresh, reasonably priced Mexican fast food that stands up to the light of day.

Related: El Pelón Taquería, Restaurante Montecristo, Trini's Mexican Grill, More more >
  Topics: On The Cheap , Entertainment, Culture and Lifestyle, Food and Cooking,  More more >
| More

Most Popular
Share this entry with Delicious
    In food-nerd circles, the question of authenticity is a loaded one.
  •   OYSTER STEW AT STEEL & RYE  |  March 01, 2013
    Pity the poor would-be restaurateur in the city of Boston.
  •   PROVENÇAL FISH STEW AT SYCAMORE  |  February 13, 2013
    For food geeks accustomed to dining in urban Boston, it's easy to be a little dismissive of suburban restaurants.
  •   LAMB BELLY AT PURITAN & COMPANY  |  February 01, 2013
    By about the end of 2011, restaurant-industry PR people had already worn out the phrase "farm to table."
    As a South Ender, I find it easy to admire the smooth professionalism and crowd-pleasing instincts of the Aquitaine Group, which operates six of its eight restaurants in the neighborhood, including Metropolis, Union, Aquitaine, and Gaslight.

 See all articles by: MC SLIM JB