Southern feel

By BRIAN DUFF  |  February 24, 2010

The menu is rounded out with lots of attractive incidentals — like the juicy pork of the fried boudin balls, the fat chunks of fried pickle, the host of Cajun sauces (try the green-heat), and the big basket of sweet potato fries for just $3. Po' Boys has some fun quirks — like an irrational hostility to mustard (it's not included on any sandwich, and is even excluded from the honey mustard sauce, which is basically honey with some mustard seeds). There are some unusual canned beers, like the Porkslap Pale Ale. The toffee-covered bread pudding was moist and sticky-sweet.

For a place with pickles in their name, they leave you wanting more than the six or seven sharp little slices you get with a sandwich. Their white-gloved pickle mascot, smiling under sinister eyebrows, is a great detail. While the space is too new to have real personality, you get the sense that it may have that in its future. The staff seems invested, and will give you their sandwich recommendation with believably tortured indecision between favorites. Out on a run-down corner of Forest, Po' Boys will look and feel right when it gets just slightly run-down itself. There is plenty of reason to think it will be around long enough to do so.

Brian Duff can be reached at bduff@une.edu.

PO' BOYS & PICKLES | 1124 Forest Ave, Portland | 207.518.9735

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