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Review: Plan B

The B is for bisexual
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 5, 2010
3.0 3.0 Stars

In this nuanced, Rohmer-like moral tale from Argentine director Marco Berger, Bruno (Manuel Vignau) is jealous of his ex-girlfriend’s new beau, Pablo (Lucas Ferraro). Bruno's out to thwart the relationship — not by wooing Laura (Mercedes Quinteros) back (he’s already sleeping with her on the side), but by seducing the allegedly bisexual Pablo.

No easy task, since both men, despite their crude jokes to the contrary, are hung up about homosexuality. (Argentina still seems a bit stodgy about such matters.)

Instead, the two form a tight bond of friendship (they think of each other as the friends they never had as 12-year-olds) — a bubble that sexuality and treachery threaten to burst. Berger is a painter, and he has an exquisite eye for color and composition: at times, the camera just settles on the abstract shapes of Buenos Aires buildings against the sky, creating a meditative canvas on which the feelings beneath the characters’ cool surfaces can seethe and curdle.

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