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Review: The Lincoln Lawyer

Slick legal mystery plays like an above-average TV crime show pilot
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 17, 2011
2.5 2.5 Stars

As nondescript as its title, Brad Furman's slick legal mystery, adapted from a Michael Connelly novel, plays like an above-average TV pilot until it gets greedy and runs 20 minutes too long, with a few too many endings. The Lincoln refers to the classic Town Car that the lawyer, Mick Haller (a haggard and drawling Matthew McConaughey), uses as a quasi-office as he tools around LA. A somewhat soiled defense attorney who's represented so many guilty clients that he's lost his innocence, Haller develops a conscience of sorts when he takes on the case of spoiled rich boy Louis Roulet (Ryan Philippe, acting spoiled and rich), who's charged with assaulting a prostitute, and whom we immediately suspect because he uses the word "faggot." Drawn into a Chinatown-like morass without a Robert Towne or a Roman Polanski to guide him, Haller is nearly bailed out by crusty supporting characters played by William H. Macy and John Leguizamo.

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  Topics: Reviews , Los Angeles, Matthew McConaughey, William H. Macy,  More more >
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