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Review: The Whistleblower

Good and evil
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 30, 2011
3.0 3.0 Stars



Larysa Kondracki's topical thriller, based on a true story, combines the moodiness of The Insider with the intensity of Serpico to dramatize a long-standing international injustice. In Ukraine, Raya, a teen rebelling against her mother, agrees to sign on with a dicey contractor for high-paying work in the West. Meanwhile, in Nebraska, Kathryn Bolkovac (Rachel Weisz), a divorced police officer seeking custody of her daughter, opts to work for a private security contractor in the Balkans for a big paycheck. Both end up in Bosnia, where Bolkovac learns that in addition to being macho pigs, her fellow officers are involved in trafficking helpless girls like Raya under the auspices of a UN humanitarian operation. Suddenly, it's no longer about Bolkovac's own problems, or the money, but about good and evil. Weisz conveys with conviction and subtlety Bolkovac's growing awareness, increased isolation, and stoic resolve as she counters systemic wickedness with common decency.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, UN, Nebraska,  More more >
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