FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: The Ides of March

George Clooney's new directorial effort
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 4, 2011
2.0 2.0 Stars



Though more contemporary than Good Night, and Good Luck. (2005), George Clooney's new directorial effort seems less topical. In it he plays Governor Mike Morris, the charismatic Democratic hopeful who just needs to win Ohio to lock up the nomination. In this fantasy world, that leads to the Oval Office, since the only Republican candidates are a bunch of dingbats — though these days that seems to be the way to win. Stephen (Ryan Gosling), Morris's press secretary, believes in his man, but the Machiavellian attitude of Paul (Philip Seymour Hoffman), the campaign manager, challenges his idealism. Even more cynical is Tom (Paul Giamatti), handler of their primary opponent; he insists that Democrats won't win until they "get down in the dirt with the elephants." Elections aren't about democracy, he says, they're about winning. Good points, but March has too many shades of Primary Colors to be otherwise relevant.

  Topics: Reviews , Politics, Boston, director,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH