FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Le Havre

Aki Kaurismäki's effective minimalism
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 8, 2011
3.0 3.0 Stars

Few filmmakers practice minimalism as effectively as Aki Kaurismäki. Every detail in the frame and every movement by a character or the camera serve a specific purpose, usually poignantly tragic, absurdly comic, and often both. He shows a rare glint of optimism, perhaps even sentimentality, in this fable about Idrissa (Blondin Miguel), an African boy who ends up in the title town when the cargo container that was supposed to deliver him to London gets misdirected. Eluding the authorities, he ends up in the care of Marcel Marx, an elderly shoeshine man, and his support group of colorful neighbors. Played by André Wilms, whose resemblance to an older Dennis Hopper gives his affability edge, Marcel is one of Kaurismäki's more successful characters, both artistically and in the context of the film. Unlike the director's typical hero, Wilms's spare performance conveys confidence rather than defeat. He and the kid warm the heart, thawing Kaurismäki's usual icy aplomb.

  Topics: Reviews , Immigration, Le Havre, Le Havre,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH