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Review: Crazy Horse

Wiseman behind the scenes at a revered dance institution
By PETER KEOUGH  |  January 24, 2012
3.0 3.0 Stars



In La Danse — The Paris Opera Ballet, Frederick Wiseman looked behind the scenes at a revered dance institution. In his new documentary he examines a dance institution of a different sort, the cabaret bar of the title, a Parisian pop-cultural icon and tourist mecca dedicated to artistically ambitious "nude chic" dancing. Except for the costumes and clientele, there seems not a lot difference between the two outfits, in part because Wiseman approaches them both with the same hand-held in-your-face camerawork and structures the films similarly. In both films, idealistic directors must put together a program under tough circumstances and tight time constraints. Backstage strategizing and confrontations are intercut with performances of their pieces, which indeed transcend the usual bump and grind, employing lighting, choreography, and costumes to eloquent, witty, and poetic effect. A fine complement to Wim Wenders's Pina, without the 3D, but with lots of tasteful T&A.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, costumes, ICON,  More more >
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