FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Bekmambetov's adaptation of the goofy bestseller
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 22, 2012
2.5 2.5 Stars

With a title like this, don't expect a PBS documentary. Once that's established, Timur Bekmambetov's visually seductive (it's shot by Caleb Deschanel) adaptation of the goofy bestseller can be a lot of fun. Certainly it beats similar mash-ups like the recent John Cusack-starring version of The Raven. It seems Abe (Benjamin Walker) wasn't fully honest about himself, because, as is revealed in his secret diary (an unfortunate narrative device last seen in John Carter), he had early run-ins with the undead that left him with a grudge. Luckily, he bumps into the mysterious Henry Sturgess (Dominic Cooper) who trains him, seemingly over the course of a weekend, on how to wield a silver-edged axe in taking out vampires. That's the part of the movie that makes sense — wait until it gets to Jefferson Davis's plan to win the Battle of Gettysburg. Maybe the kids will be inspired to look up the real story; at least they won't see the Confederates as the good guys.

  Topics: Reviews , John Cusack, Dominic Cooper, John Carter,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH