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Review: People Like Us

Alex Kurtzman's creepy family melodrama
By PETER KEOUGH  |  June 28, 2012
2.0 2.0 Stars



I, for one, would not want to be a person like the characters in Alex Kurtzman's creepy family melodrama. Such as wastrel Sam (Chris Pine), who blows a major deal the same day his estranged father dies. He returns home where mom (Michelle Pfeiffer) gives him a hard time and his dad's lawyer gives him his inheritance: $150,000 and a name. So far, the story has the makings of a black comedy about dissolution and despair, but then it takes a turn in the Nicholas Sparks direction. Before you can say Princess Leia, Sam discovers that the name is that of his father's grandson, and the boy's mother, Frankie (Elizabeth Banks), is the half-sister that Sam never knew he had. Will Sam tell his sister who he is and give the kid the money? Anyway, there's about an hour of movie to go, so Sam kind of starts dating her. Then the platitudes kick in. The fact that the story is autobiographical doesn't make me feel any better about it.

  Topics: Reviews , characters, summary, autobiographical,  More more >
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