FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Trishna

Tess of the D'Urbervilles set in present-day India
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 17, 2012
2.5 2.5 Stars



If nothing else, Michael Winterbottom's updating of Tess of the D'Urbervilles to present-day India proves that Thomas Hardy will depress you no matter what the setting. When her father is disabled in an accident, Trishna (Freida Pinto), a village girl, accepts a job from Jay (Riz Ahmed), the scion of a wealthy hotelier. Jay's seeming kindness inevitably deteriorates into a caddishness that combines the negative traits of both Angel Clare and Alec d'Urberville from the original novel, and Trishna does what she must in a cruel, patriarchal society. Some segues into Bollywood provide contrast with the Biblical starkness of the tale, which Winterbottom heightens with lush imagery and a melancholy soundtrack. But the performers seem apathetic about their fates, and the tragedy unfolds with a perfunctory arbitrariness. The third of Winterbottom's Hardy adaptations, it surpasses The Claim (2000) but falls short of the masterful Jude (1996).

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, girl, wealthy,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH