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Review: 2 Days In New York

Rowdy follow-up to 2 Days In Paris
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 17, 2012

Her angelic appearance notwithstanding, Julie Delpy is one raunchy woman. It was evident back in 2007 in 2 Days in Paris, and it comes through even more in this equally rowdy follow-up. Let's just say I can't think of another filmmaker who's shot her towel-clad dad, Albert Delpy, bending over with the family jewels prominently on display. Delpy père plays Jeannot, the father of Julie's character Marion, who along with the rest of her family have descended from Paris to camp out in the Manhattan apartment she shares with her boyfriend.

>> INTERVIEW: Julie Delpy explores her neuroses in New York <<

As Mingus, Chris Rock shows his skill as a straightman, both to the rambunctious pater familias Jeannot and a cardboard standy of Barack Obama. The latter is representative of the sly, lighthearted way Delpy broaches such serious subjects as politics, interracial romance, and artistic integrity. As well as grief and loss; her late mother Marie Pillet, prominent in the earlier film, makes an unusual cameo.

  Topics: Reviews , New York, New York City, France,  More more >
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