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Review: The Apparition

Todd Lincoln's tepid feature
By PEG ALOI  |  August 29, 2012
1.0 1.0 Stars

Todd Lincoln's tepid feature debut borrows from some horror standouts of the last 15 years, such as The Blair Witch Project, The Ring, The Grudge, and Paranormal Activity, and some earlier classics, like Poltergeist and The Amityville Horror, but doesn't offer anything new, let alone entertaining. After a muddled prologue suggesting a paranormal experiment gone awry, the movie cuts to Kelly (Ashley Greene) and Ben (Sebastian Stan) cohabiting happily in a McMansion in a deserted California subdivision. But weird things start happening — mold on the walls, lights blinking — and Kelly suspects that Ben is somehow responsible. So they call in Ben's paranormally gifted pal Patrick (Tom Felton) to expel the entity. There's some incoherent babbling about energy fields and psychomanteums, and some cryptic gambits that go nowhere (why all the close-ups of the power lines?). The only scary thing about this is that a film so derivative and contrived managed to get produced at all.

Related: Review: The Bay, Review: Friday the 13th (2009), Review: The House of the Devil, More more >
  Topics: Reviews , Horror, The Blair Witch Project, Paranormal Activity,  More more >
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