FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Broken English

A safe ticket seller
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 3, 2007
2.5 2.5 Stars
inside_TRAILERS_English_unt
BROKEN ENGLISH: A Woman Under the Influence it’s not.

John Cassavetes’s kids Nick and Zoe might not shape independent cinema the way their father did, but they’ll probably sell more tickets. In her debut feature, Zoe turns to the safety of the chick flick, with the ever watchable Parker Posey as Nora, a 30ish career woman in New York who can’t figure out why she’s not married like her friends or why she always has bad luck with men. Possible explanations include drinking, pills, low self-esteem, and her inability to resist jumping into bed on the first date — so when she holds off on sleeping with Julien (Melvil Poupaud), a French guy in a fedora, for almost two days, it seems he’s the one. With mom (Zoe’s real-life mom, Gena Rowlands) offering banal advice and noting “how hard it is for a woman today,” you feel more confident that things are going to end okay than you would while watching, say, A Woman Under the Influence. Drea de Matteo excels as the unhappily married best friend.
Related: Review: Daddy Longlegs, The Boston Phoenix–Alumni Film Critics’ Poll, Paris je t'aime, More more >
  Topics: Reviews , John Cassavetes, Drea de Matteo, Parker Posey,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH