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Ira and Abby

Kitch, clichés, and neurosis — a fatal combination
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 10, 2007

VIDEO: Watch the trailer for Ira & Abby.

Any Manhattan-set comedy that opens in a psychiatrist’s office invites invidious comparisons to Woody Allen. But Robert Cary (Standard Time) is not up to even latter-day Woody standards — he’s one of the few directors who can make Fred Willard unfunny — and he gets no help from the insipid script by Jennifer Westfeldt (Kissing Jessica Stein). Westfeldt also stars as the Diane Keatonish Abby, who’s won the heart of Ira (a charmless Chris Messina), the analysand of the opening, offering freedom from the repression and joyless infidelity of his parents (both psychiatrists). As Abby’s free-spirited father, Willard proves no better than Ira’s dismal parents, and despite frequent sessions with its assorted shrinks, the film suffers from a fatal combination of kitsch, clichés, and neurosis.
Related: Review: Greenberg, Power failure, Jindabyne, More more >
  Topics: Reviews , Woody Allen, Fred Willard, Jennifer Westfeldt,  More more >
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