FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Smoke screens

By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 18, 2008

1) Two (sometimes more) dumb, latently homosexual stoner buddies as protagonists
2) A dumb, arrogant, entitled, and uptight cop or authority figure as an antagonist
3) A silly quest (for weed, usually) or a paranoid flight (from the cops, the heebie-jeebies), or both
4) A concluding conflagration or confrontation, in which everyone usually gets high

Other, optional elements include:
1) A noisy and malodorous bowel movement as a plot device
2) A roach (or other lit object) falling into the lap of someone driving a car
3) Women ranking behind dope and food — but ahead of beer — as objects of desire
4) A new and/or bizarre cannabis-delivery system
5) A maddening, unending circularity, not unlike my own bad experiences with pot

Okay, that last one is a little subjective. But the other categories are pretty consistent.

Of course, there’s a bridge between the idealistic stoners of the ’60s and the idiotic stoners of today. To find it, first it’s necessary to ponder the great smoke-out that began with the Reagan years, the era of “Just Say No.” No more funny druggies with big joints and innocent, hedonistic buffoonery. Instead, dopers were demonized or doomed. Like the suburban kids in Tim Hunter's chilling River’s Edge (1986) [See correction, below.] . They’re freaky sociopaths zombified by Dennis Hopper’s killer weed. They can be summarized in two words: Crispin Glover.

As in the ’60s, grass gave way to meaner drugs like smack, crack, coke, and crystal meth, served up in moralizing melodramas like Gus Van Sant’s hip but preachy (“You never fuck me and I always drive”) Drugstore Cowboy (1989) and My Own Private Idaho (1991). Or Generation X burnouts like Less than Zero (1987) and Bright Lights, Big City (1988). And don’t forget Brian De Palma’s Scarface (1983), which no doubt has scared straight a generation of gangstas wearing Tony Montana T-shirts.

Despite the crackdown, however, a spark of the Up in Smoke legacy still glowed. Like Sean Penn’s Spicoli in Amy Heckerling’s Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), this unsavory element was marginalized in society (and was only intended to be a smaller part of the film), but was embraced by audiences nonetheless. It went underground in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989), a doper comedy without dope. But when the real deal finally returned, the generation that had engendered it had come of age, ushering in a variation on the stoner comedy, a subgenre I’ll call . . .

Flashbacks
As the ’60s and ’70s potheads grew into middle-class respectability, they still pined for the good old days. This stoned-age nostalgia not only sparked a new kind of stoner movie, but also started making the genre, if not the practice, respectable. An early example is Bill Murray as Hunter S. Thompson in the widely despised Where the Buffalo Roam (1980) — Thompson would be resurrected by Johnny Depp in 1998 in Terry Gilliam’s far superior but equally scorned Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Other examples include Oliver Stone’s Platoon (1986), which features a scene in which Willem Dafoe literally takes a shotgun and blows ganja smoke into Charlie Sheen’s mouth in ’Nam in the ’60s; Richard Linklater’s latter-day American Graffiti, Dazed and Confused (1993); and Cameron Crowe’s Almost Famous (2000), his memoir of covering rock and roll as a teenage journalist for Rolling Stone in the 1970s.

< prev  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |   next >
Related: Pot Edward Island, Drugs and culture, Legalize pot now, More more >
  Topics: Features , Celebrity News, Entertainment, Norman Mailer,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH