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Year in Film: Risky business

By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 24, 2008

Trouble the Water
Those wondering whether Hurricane Katrina was really such a big deal have one more terrific documentary to set them straight. Providing a personal focus to complement the epic sweep of Spike Lee's When the Levees Broke, directors Carl Deal and Tia Lessin make generous use of videos shot by their subjects — New Orleans Ninth Ward residents Kim and Scott Roberts — before, during, and after the disaster. The artless footage suggests a real-world Cloverfield, but the people are resourceful and worth caring about. They and their videos prevail over the indifference of nature and our government.

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Related: Review: Sweetgrass, Review: Clash of the Titans, Jewishfilm.2010, More more >
  Topics: Features , Movies, Mike Leigh, Dale Denton,  More more >
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