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Jewishfilm.2010

By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 31, 2010

As the title suggests, Omri Givon’s SEVEN MINUTES IN HEAVEN (MFA: April 10 at 7:10 pm) also aspires to the spiritual, though with uneven results. A year ago, Galia (Reymond Amsalem) barely survived a suicide bomber on a bus; badly burned and clinically dead for seven minutes, she was revived by the efforts of an EMT. Now her boyfriend, who was put into a coma by the same attack, has died, and Galia feels compelled to find the person who saved her life.

For the most part, Givon steers this spooky, psychological mystery away from M. Night Shyamalan gimmickry by means of understated, eloquent imagery, well-crafted editing, and resonant performances. Although the politics of the terrorist act are never explored (to its credit, the film doesn’t sink to the exploitiveness of Remember Me), the themes of second chances and forgiveness ring true in a region much in need of both.

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