Akudama

Music seen at 14 Winter St, May 10, 2008
By CHAD CHAMBERLAIN  |  May 14, 2008

Brooklyn-based Akudama played a house show in the West End. They’ll be touring their second independent release all summer long, and the live takes of their latest songs sounded pretty good in the dimly lit living room on Winter Street.

The turnout was scant, but the mood was up. Frontman Blake Charleton is a natural showstopper; his voice glides with ease into his nice falsetto at all the perfect moments. Brothers Cayce and Calvin Pia (drums and guitar respectively) are the backbone of the band. The drums are solid and tasteful, and the guitars go from ’60s soul-influenced to Doves-esque ambience, yet always maintain a distinct sound.

The band ooze a romantic DIY attitude. They record and produce their own albums, book their own lengthy tours, and appear to be more than happy to play house shows along the way, even if paid only in beer and snacks. This aspect of the band underscores their attractive sound: think Doves meets Minus the Bear meets, oh I don’t know, maybe the early Temptations.

Best thing about the night? The cops never showed up.

On the web
Akudama:
www.myspace.com/akudama

Related: Triple threat, Grrrrab bag, Keep rotating, More more >
  Topics: Live Reviews , Minus the Bear
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