Best in show

Poster boys honored  
By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  April 26, 2006

Two men behind the displays of the Maine Historical Society were recently awarded laurels. Eric Eaton and John Mayer received honors from the New England Museum Association for their work on the publications accompanying the 2005 exhibit “The City Awakes.” The exhibit of paintings, prints, and decorative work presented the art of the dynamic years following the American Revolution, when industry, culture, and art surged in the city that would become Portland.

Eaton and Mayer’s collaboration on the publication materials for “The City Awakes” brought them first place for the show’s exhibit card, and second place for the exhibit’s poster, awards that will be announced in the summer issue of the New England Museum Association’s newsletter. Their work was chosen from 215 entries from 81 museums entered in nineteen categories, and will be exhibited at NEMA’s annual conference in November before being donated to the Boston Public Library. The two men are presently co-curators of "A Riot of Words" at the society's museum at 489 Congress Street, Portland.

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