Instant runoff

By DEIRDRE FULTON  |  June 6, 2012

Such tools are also effective in areas that have succeeded in separating the majority of sewer and storm drain systems, like the Capisic Brook Watershed in the Riverton-Deering-Rosemont neighborhoods. There, the storm drains take the runoff — everything that comes off parking lots, roads, lawns, and sidewalks — directly into the brook. Working with homeowners to capture and reuse rainwater is another way to make local waterways healthier.

As Doug Roncarati, Portland's stormwater program coordinator, says: "It's a lot easier to keep pollution from getting into the system than to filter it out."

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