Fourth-estate follies!

Remembering the year in media malfeasance
By ADAM REILLY  |  December 24, 2008

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Granted, other years have had flashier media embarrassments (Jayson Blair, Stephen Glass, a complacent press cheerily abetting the march to war in Iraq — that sort of thing). But that doesn't mean that 2008 lacked for media misdeeds. Quite the contrary! In fact — thanks, perhaps, to the combination of a) the presidential race, and b) the ongoing immolation of the nation's newspaper industry — there was a veritable cornucopia of media low points to enjoy in the bygone year. Here, for your reading pleasure, is the Phoenix's recap of the best of the worst:

1) ALL THE WINKING INNUENDO THAT'S FIT TO PRINT
In a front-page story on John McCain's problematic ties to lobbyists, the New York Times highlights McCain's alleged/unproven/denied affair with lobbyist Vicki Iseman. Their relationship, the Times explains, shows how McCain's "confidence in his own integrity has sometimes seemed to blind him to potentially embarrassing conflicts of interest." Hmm. Perhaps another, factual example would have worked better?

2) ARISE, KNIGHTS OF THE INVISIBLE EMPIRE! ACTUALLY, ER, SCRATCH THAT . . .
When a young white woman working for the College Republican National Committee shows up at a Pittsburgh police station with a "B" carved onto her face (that's for "Barack"), claiming that she was disfigured by a big, knife-wielding black man who'd taken umbrage at her McCain bumper sticker, most of the media proceed with caution. Not so the Drudge Report and Fox News, which immediately give the story massive play. Turns out it's a hoax, leaving both outlets with an "E" on their respective faces (that's for "egg").

3) HIS COLD, DEAD FACTS
The Times' 2500-word obituary for Charlton Heston generates approximately 270 words of corrections, meted out over three separate days. Errors include Heston's age, year of birth, and birth name.

4)THIS REALLY PUTS THINGS IN PERSPECTIVE . . .
After Meet the Press host Tim Russert's death at age 58, following a heart attack, his press brethren grieve so loudly, so publicly, and for such a long period of time that their disproportionate mourning becomes a case study in media solipsism.

5) HE ALSO GOES BY "PRINCE OF SHITTY EULOGIES"
Arriving late to the Russert love fest, conservative columnist Bob Novak, a/k/a the "Prince of Darkness," praises the late NBC mainstay for being an "extraordinary source" — thereby raising unanswerable questions about Russert's journalistic practices and integrity.

6) ALL THE HALF-ASSED, NEO-CON PABULUM THAT'S FIT TO PRINT
In January, the Times welcomes William Kristol, the neo-conservative eminence and Weekly Standard editor, to its stable of columnists. It's a great opportunity for Kristol to sway the American public during a hotly contested election. Instead, he makes an embarrassing mistake in his debut column (conflating conservative commentators Michelle Malkin and Michael Medved); shows an affinity for lazy arguments presented in tepid, almost grudging prose; and refuses to discuss his previous condemnations of the Times with public editor Clark Hoyt. For good measure, he disparages the Times again, during an appearance on The Daily Show — and, in his role as unofficial advisor to the McCain campaign, helps convince McCain to pick Sarah Palin. All in all, not a good year.

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Related: Rise of the political bogeyman, The Fox and the Wolff, Mr. Respectable, More more >
  Topics: Media -- Dont Quote Me , Barack Obama, Keith Olbermann, Keith Olbermann,  More more >
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