Let the horse race begin

Odds are you won’t be able to avoid the run-up to 2008, so you might as well start laying your bests now
By STEVEN STARK  |  February 14, 2007

070216_politics_main

Welcome to the 2008 Presidential Tote Board. Over the next 21 tortuous months, in what promises to be the longest campaign in American history, we’ll lay odds on all the candidates running for the presidency, both in the weekly paper and more regularly online at thePhoenix.com/toteboard. We know you can’t wait to see Joe Biden start to self-destruct (Wait, that’s already happened!) or John McCain lose his temper in public for the first time. But before satisfying the betting folks, let’s look at the larger elements that will determine the winners. Over the next two years, you’ll read a lot about how organization and money really establish who wins or how the Internet has hijacked the whole process. Forget about it: presidential politics conforms to a small number of rules that don’t much change from one campaign to the next. So, before charging up the scoreboard, let’s spend a few weeks going over the rules of the game.

Rule 1: Ideas win campaigns
Sure, a winning campaign benefits from lots of things, from a ton of money and good press to a successful strategy. But by focusing on these things, the media tend to overlook what a successful candidate needs above all: a central, compelling idea. Voters don’t care which organizers presidential candidates hire in New Hampshire; they care about where their prospective leaders promise to take the country.

A compelling idea is not a platform or a collection of boring policy proposals. Rather, it’s a broad animating concept that voters can rally around. John Kennedy inspired America by proclaiming “It’s Time to Get This Country Moving Again.” After the traumas of Watergate and Vietnam, Jimmy Carter reminded the country that it needed a complete Washington outsider at the reins of government. Bill Clinton understood that a new Democratic Party needed to re-establish its appeal to the average voter. And, although Ronald Reagan’s ad-meisters devised the slogan “It’s Morning in America” during the 1984 re-election campaign, the candidate for years had articulated the same simple, optimistic, conservative message of freedom from “big government”

This year, a lot of candidates have big ideas. As the first serious woman presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton will most likely focus her campaign on the idea that a woman would be a very different and better type of leader than a man. (Whether Hillary represents that notion authentically will be fodder for later columns.) Barack Obama will undoubtedly articulate a similar vision from the perspective of race; he’s already begun to argue for a new kind of partisan-free politics that could tie neatly into this theme.

It’s a tribute to how powerful the notion of the first female or black president is that Arizona governor Bill Richardson, the nation’s first serious Hispanic candidate, may have trouble getting traction just because that idea can’t compete with the other two this year.

With Obama and Clinton in the race, the rest of the Democratic field better have big ideas of their own. John Edwards — with his poverty-centered “two Americas” theme — has clearly given some thought to how he might compete with the putative front-runners. The rest of the Democratic field, however, doesn’t seem as prepared. It’s an axiom of presidential politics that candidates who haven’t articulated “big ideas” before a national campaign are unlikely to be able to do it once the curtain goes up. That’s bad news for Joe Biden, Christopher Dodd, and the rest of the Democratic field.

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  Topics: Stark Ravings , Michael Dukakis, Mitt Romney, Climatology,  More more >
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The Field

Dems
Frontrunners
Clinton
Obama
Edwards

The Pack
Richardson
Vilsack

The Impossible Dream
Biden
Dodd
Kucinich
Gravel

Hamlets
Gore
Clark

GOP
Frontrunners
McCain
Giuliani

The Pack
Romney
Brownback

The Impossible Dream
Gilmore
Huckabee
Duncan
Tancredo
Paul

Hamlets
Gingrich
Hagel
Thompson

ARTICLES BY STEVEN STARK
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