Propping up a puppet

Obama gets it wrong on Afghanistan
By TED RALL  |  February 25, 2009

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"If you ask me anything I don't know, I'm not going to answer," Yogi Berra once said. President Obama should do the same.

The president's recent interview with Canada's CBC television network demonstrates that he doesn't know much about Afghanistan. But that isn't stopping him from talking about it — even while he escalates America's war there.

"Well, I think Afghanistan is still winnable, in the sense of our ability to ensure that it is not a launching pad for attacks against North America," he told his interviewer.

How is it possible for this well-educated man — like me, he went to Columbia, which had a superb history department — to be so ignorant? Afghanistan has never been a "launching pad" for a single attack, much less plural "attacks" against the US. (Or, as far as I know, Canadistan.) It's true that, until 2000, there were a few camps in Afghanistan. But the vast majority of the training camps loosely affiliated with Al Qaeda or other militant Islamist groups were, and remain in, Pakistan. Moreover, most of the jihadis who trained there wanted to fight countries other than the US: Chechens seeking independence from Russia, Uyghurs waging a low-intensity insurgency against China, Uzbeks trying to overthrow Uzbekistan's dictator.

German intelligence officials have said that three of the 19 September 11th hijackers had attended such camps. But that's an incidental fact. If you're looking for the men responsible for 9/11, you need to start in Egypt and Saudi Arabia. Well-connected religious fanatics and government officials in both countries conceived the plot, recruited its personnel, and provided the money. If jihadi training camps bother you, go where most of them are: Pakistan. Afghanistan never represented a significant threat to the United States. And it still doesn't.

More disturbing still is Obama's assertion that Afghanistan, where US soldiers are even likelier to die than in Iraq, is "winnable." To be fair to the president, he admits that "you cannot solve the problem of Afghanistan, the Taliban, the spread of extremism in that region solely through military means." But the key word is "solely." He's not only keeping troops there — he's sending tens of thousands more. US and NATO occupation troops aren't part of the solution; they're a big part of the problem.

Hamid Karzai, the former Unocal oil consultant hired by Bush to run Afghanistan's US-supported puppet regime, knows this. "Entering by force our people's houses is against the government of Afghanistan," he told foreign dignitaries in Kabul in December. "This way the Afghan government will be destroyed and it will never be strengthened when in my country, the foreign soldiers go and arrest people, hit them and even kill them."

But Obama isn't listening. Just last week, another US air strike killed 15 supposed militants in the northwestern province of Herat. Afghans, who live on the actual ground, said all 15 were civilians.

One quarter of all civilians killed in Afghanistan in 2008 were blown up in US and NATO bombing raids.

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