FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Secrets Of The Tribe

 Their secrets are indeed disturbing
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 15, 2010
3.5 3.5 Stars

IFFB_secretsofthetribe2_wid 

The tribe of the title, as José Padilha’s deft and outrageous documentary makes clear, are not the Stone Age Yanomami people of the Amazon — a gold mine of material exploited by researchers for the past five decades — but the anthropologists themselves. And their secrets are indeed disturbing. At the beginning of the film, one of the most famous,

Napoleon Chagnon, quips sarcastically to a gathering of admirers about the jealous folks who have accused him of everything including genocide. The admirers laugh, but the charges, as Padilha’s evidence suggests, are not funny.

Neither are the accusations of pedophilia leveled at Chagnon’s colleague, Jacques Lizot. And almost as dismaying are the petty vanities, vicious treacheries, and ideological feuding of the anthropologists interviewed — it all makes the savages look noble indeed.

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Science and Technology, Movies,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH