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Review: The Oscar Nominated Short Films 2012: Documentary

Powerful images
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 10, 2012

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The films in this program contain some of the most powerful images to be seen on the screen this year. Lucy Walker's The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, a chronicle of the tidal wave that struck Japan last March, opens with rough footage from a cell phone of the water surging in, sweeping along with it houses, cars, burning buildings, and the people trying to rescue those climbing the hill from which the video is taken. Against this horror, the cherry trees blossom a month later. Not much mitigates the tragedy in James Spione's Incident in New Baghdad as an ex-soldier recovering from PTSD relives his nightmare when he sees on the news an image of himself carrying a wounded child. And Gail Dolgin and Robin Fryday's The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement honors James Armstrong, who marched for voting rights in Alabama in 1965, a struggle for justice that is far from over.

  Topics: Reviews , Lucy Walker, Civil Rights, Oscars,  More more >
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