FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

TransSiberian

A sleekly crafted Hitchcockian thriller
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 13, 2008
3.0 3.0 Stars
transinside.jpg

Matryoshkas, those nesting wooden Russian dolls, serve as the MacGuffin in Brad Anderson’s sleekly crafted Hitchcockian thriller. They also suggest a model for the film’s structure, a cold layering of secrets within secrets. The payoff might be superficial, but the suspense and the intrigue compel. Credit Anderson’s ingenious use of space: he alternates between the claustrophobic confines of the train of the title and the blank vistas of a Siberian winter. American husband and wife Roy (Woody Harrelson) and Jessie (Emily Mortimer) share a compartment with Eurotrash backpacker Carlos (Eduardo Noriega) and his girlfriend, Abby (Kate Mara). Goody-goody Roy not only ignores the strangers’ unwholesomeness but is in the dark about the intentions of Grinko (Ben Kingsley), a Russian narc. Not so the less innocent Jessie, whose indiscretions and lies get them into deeper trouble. Although it doesn’t go as far as Strangers on a Train, TransSiberian is worth the ride. English + Russian | 111 minutes | West Newton

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Movies, Emily Mortimer,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH