FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

Brad Peyton's sequel
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 7, 2012
1.5 1.5 Stars

I liked the tiny elephants and the Rock bouncing berries off his pecs, but Brad Peyton's sequel is as bad as the 2008 original. Now a rebellious teen, Sean (Josh Hutcherson) can't accept his stepdad Hank (Dwayne Johnson). What better way to bond than by solving the code sent by his granddad (Michael Caine) that instructs them to combine the maps in Gulliver's Travels, Treasure Island, and Jules Verne's eponymous novel to find the legendary atoll somewhere in the South Pacific? So much for literature; on to the clichés, which include Luis Guzmán as a buffoonish native helicopter pilot, Vanessa Hudgens as his tough-cookie daughter, and Caine as a shadow of his Cockney self. Since this a Walden Production, family values trump suspense, fun, and, of course, mystery. Let's just say that everyone learns that having a dad is great and sometimes heading home on the Nautilus beats mining a mountain of gold.

  Topics: Reviews , Movie Reviews, film, The Rock
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH