FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: The ABCs of Death

By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 12, 2013
1.5 1.5 Stars



Judging from their contributions, some of the filmmakers behind this 26-part anthology find death less fearsome than the thought of a cute girl farting. Two segments confront this concept, including "F is for Fart" by Noboru Iguchi, and others feature women engaged in similar bodily functions. However, Lee Hardcastle's amusing claymation "T is for Toilet" does justice to the terror of plumbing fixtures; and, saving the best for last, Yoshihiro Nishimura's "Z is for Zetsumetsu" includes an SS she-wolf sporting a three-foot dildo, a Dr. Strangelove type shouting out non sequiturs, and the end of the world — and that's just the beginning. Speaking of beginnings and endings, expect neither in Ernesto Díaz Espinoza's exercise in time-travel paradox, "C is for Cycle." Other contributions score points, but in general this is a good idea wasted, disturbing mostly for its puerility, crudeness, and misogyny. The $5000-per-short budget probably didn't help, but having only two women filmmakers might be a bigger problem.

Related: Review: Gone, Review: Act of Valor, Review: Chico & Rita, More more >
  Topics: Reviews , Movies, review, film
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH