FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Jeff, Who Lives at Home

Skillful contrivance
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 15, 2012
3.0 3.0 Stars



Everything is connected. At least in some screenplays, and it takes an artist to make the contrivance look like serendipity. The title slacker (Jason Segel) in the Duplass Brothers' meditation on fate and fatuity is obsessed with M. Night Shyamalan's Signs, and the filmmakers' gentle irony about his bad taste exemplifies their empathy and tonal skill. Jeff is 30 and lives with his mother (Susan Sarandon), who gets him out of the basement with an order to buy some glue to repair a slat in a cabinet door. But Jeff has another blurry mission in mind, a destiny that involves a wrong number, the name Kevin, and several hits on a bong. And so the story follows his determined search for resolution, despite the mocking skepticism of his pompous, feckless brother Pat (Ed Helms). Maybe it's Segel's sad naïveté, or the filmmakers' inventiveness and metaphorical dexterity, but even when the contrivance kicks in, it seems like Jeff might have the right idea.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, in theaters, summary,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH