FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Hope Springs

Separate worlds
By PETER KEOUGH  |  August 9, 2012
2.5 2.5 Stars



Elderly couples in the movies are so cute, but when did Tommy Lee Jones and Meryl Streep slip into that category? The two play Kay and Arnold, spouses from Nebraska who sleep in separate bedrooms and live in separate worlds. Until Kay, played by Streep as a less shrieky Edith Bunker, demands that the curmudgeonly Arnold, played by Jones as Tommy Lee Jones, join her for counseling with pop psychologist Dr. Feld (Steve Carell) at the Maine resort of the title. It's hardly The African Queen, but it does pilot some rough waters when the therapist questions them on their sex life and then assigns them "exercises." Director David Frankel downplays the sentiment and allows his stars to explore the more tragic nuances of their stereotypical roles. But he's not so lucky with Carell's self-righteous therapist. The doc's favorite metaphor for fixing a marriage is breaking a nose and resetting it. By the third time he makes the comparison you'd like see that method tried out on him.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, short take, in theaters,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH