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Review: The Other Son

By GERALD PEARY  |  October 24, 2012
2.5 2.5 Stars



It's a far-fetched premise: two boys mixed up at birth, a Palestinian raised by an Israeli-army colonel and his French wife in Tel Aviv, a Jew brought up by a West Bank Muslim family who have had a son killed in the occupation. The narrative happens 18 years later, when the families finally discover the disturbing truth. And that brings the ethnically mixed cast together for both quarreling and peacemaking, and for decisions about how to relate to two teenagers who grew up with the wrong parents. French filmmaker Lorraine Levy mostly makes it work, thanks to an appealing ensemble of actors, and to her sincere conviction, played out scene after scene, that Arabs and Jews can find common ground if they actually get to know each other.

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