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Review: The Invisible War

Kirby Dick's documentary on rape in the military
By PETER KEOUGH  |  July 3, 2012
3.5 3.5 Stars



A few years ago, documentarian Kirby Dick read an article about rape among the troops and was shocked to see that no one had made a movie on the subject. So the director of Twist of Faith (2004) and This Film Is Not Yet Rated (2006) decided to make his own. Stylistically straightforward, it opens with a montage of enlistment ads aimed at women followed by harrowing accounts from those who joined up about being raped and abused, sometimes by their commanding officers. And it's not a rare occurrence; as the Department of Defense statistics Dick quotes reveal, the crime pervades the system. Equally outrageous has been the official response: not only have few perpetrators been punished, but the victims have themselves been accused of such crimes as "adultery." It gets worse; but in the end there is something to cheer about — vindication for some victims, and proof that a film can make a difference.

  Topics: Reviews , Boston, rape, Us,  More more >
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